Thursday, November 29, 2007

Dolores Huerta at Oxnard College


Yesterday Dolores Huerta, co-founder of the United Farm Workers union, spoke at Oxnard College. In her presentation, Dolores Huerta spoke of the early achievements of the UFW in fighting for the provision of drinking water and sanitation facilities in the fields that workers labored, eliminating the use of the backbreaking short-handle hoe, improving the overall working environment for farm workers, and securing union contracts with agricultural employers.

In carrying on the legacy of the Community Service Organization that trained Cesar Chavez, Dolores Huerta, and many others, the Dolores Huerta Foundation trains and hires community organizers to carry on the struggle for social justice. Throughout her talk, Dolores Huerta urged the audience of college and high school students, faculty, staff, and administrators to become active in their communities to struggle for positive social change near and far.

Here is the URL to the local newspaper report on the event: http://www.venturacountystar.com/news/2007/nov/29/power-is-in-us-labor-leader-says-in-oxnard-talk/

Thursday, November 1, 2007

Smithsonian Institution Advisory Board member Vicki L. Ruiz

University of California at Irvine professor of History and interim Dean of the Humanities, Vick L. Ruiz (http://www.humanities.uci.edu/history/faculty/ruiz/) has been elected to the Advisory Board of the Smithsonian Institution. Among the Smithsonian’s many initiatives, Professor Ruiz seeks to promote the Bracero History Project, in consortium with George Mason University, the Institute of Oral History at the University of Texas at El Paso, and the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America at Brown University.

Indeed, during the spring of 2008 students, faculty, and staff at California State University Channel Islands will be conducting workshops and collecting oral histories to contribute to the Bracero History Project. A traveling exhibit is an aspect of the Bracero History Project to further document, exhibit, and share the multifaceted history the
Bracero Program. In April of 2008, CSUCI will incorporate the study of Bracero Program into its week-long celebration of the life of Cesar Chavez. (http://www.csuci.edu/news/releases/Events_Planned_to_Celebrate_Legacy_of_César_Chávez.htm)

Currently, I am documenting the history of Cesar Chavez’s organizing as director of the Community Service Organization in Ventura County from 1958 to late 1959. During this time Cesar Chavez and the Chicana/o community of Ventura County fought the displacement of domestic workers by the agricultural industry’s ever increasing use of braceros. Indeed, this struggle and momentary victory inspired Cesar Chavez to resign from the CSO to create the United Farm Workers Union in Delano, California.

fpb

Sunday, October 14, 2007

Chicana/o Studies Tenure-Track Opening at California State University Channel Islands

Tenure-Track Chicana/o Studies Recruitment
California State University Channel Islands
Open Date: 10/7/07
Review Begins: 11/2/07
Open until filled

Position Description / Responsibilities : CSUCI seeks applicants at the Assistant, Associate or Full Professor level to implement the Bachelor of Arts program in Chicana/o Studies, scheduled to open in the fall of 2008. Associate/Full Professor Required Qualifications: A Ph.D., Ed.D., or MFA in an academic home discipline in education, the arts, social sciences or humanities with expertise in Chicana/o Studies, Latina/o Studies, and/or Transborder Studies; administrative experience and curriculum and program development experience; a record of effective teaching with a variety of methodologies and theoretical approaches; a record of scholarly achievement; and experience with and commitment to working in multiethnic, multilingual, and multicultural environments on an off campus. Associate/Full Professor Preferred Qualifications: Spanish language fluency; experience with experiential and service learning pedagogies. Assistant Professor Required Qualifications: A Ph.D., Ed.D., or MFA in an academic home discipline in education, the arts, social sciences or humanities with expertise in Chicana/o Studies, Latina/o Studies, and/or Transborder Studies; demonstrate the potential to create a record of effective teaching with a variety of methodologies and theoretical approaches; detail a scholarly agenda to achieve tenure and promotion; demonstrate the capacity to assume administrative, curriculum, and programmatic responsibilities appropriate to this rank; and experience with and commitment to working in multiethnic, multilingual, and multicultural environments. Preferred Qualifications: Spanish proficiency; willingness to adopt experiential and service learning pedagogies.

Minimum Degree Requirements: Ph.D., Ed.D., or MFA in an academic home discipline in education, the arts, social sciences or humanities with expertise in Chicana/o Studies, Latina/o Studies, and/or Transborder Studies.

Required Qualifications: Associate/Full Professor Required Qualifications: Administrative experience and curriculum and program development experience; a record of effective teaching with a variety of methodologies and theoretical approaches; a record of scholarly achievement; and experience with and commitment to working in multiethnic, multilingual, and multicultural environments on an off campus.

Preferred Qualifications: Associate/Full Professor Preferred Qualifications: Spanish language fluency; experience with experiential and service learning pedagogies. Evidence of commitment and ability to work in teams. Assistant Professor Required Qualifications: Spanish proficiency; willingness to adopt experiential and service learning pedagogies.Assistant Professor Required Qualifications: Demonstrate the potential to create a record of effective teaching with a variety of methodologies and theoretical approaches; detail a scholarly agenda to achieve tenure and promotion; demonstrate the capacity to assume administrative, curriculum, and programmatic responsibilities appropriate to this rank; and experience with and commitment to working in multiethnic, multilingual, and multicultural environments.

For details visit: https://www.csucifacultyjobs.com/applicants/jsp/shared/frameset/Frameset.jsp?time=1192194411370

Tuesday, October 9, 2007

Ventura County Farm Worker History

Manuel Unzueta presented a lecture on Saturday, October 6th, at the Rancho Sespe community center in the city of Fillmore, California. Unzueta spoke on the origins of farm worker corridos that emerged out of a joint project in the 1970s consisting of University of California at Santa Barbara academics and the Casa de la Raza. In promoting the Unzueta lecture, Ventura County activist Moses Mora detailed that, “some (then) young local Chicano academics put forth a call to farmworkers from Santa Maria to Ventura County to submit poetry and songs about their lives. They were overwhelmed with the response and got the Library of Congress in documenting this history.” A book was also published. Titles within the Alma Chicana de Aztlan cd are: El Corrido del Chicano/Mexicano, El Corrido del Rancho Sespe, La Sobrina, Corrido del Chino Valdez, La Despedida al Rancho Sespe, El Mojado, Yo Soy Mexicano Señores, Tanto Tienes, Tanto Vales, Corrido del Campesino and Corrido a Damian García. These songs document the experiences of struggle and perseverance among farm workers.

Before the lecture Aztec dancers performed before guest and residents of the Rancho Sespe farm worker housing community of the Cabrillo Economic Development Corporation. Moses Mora, Dr. Gabino Aguirre, and Manuela Aparicio-Twitchell are currently organizing Manuel Unzueta speaking engagements in Santa Paula, Oxnard, and, possibly, at California State University Channel Islands.
fpb

Monday, October 1, 2007

C.V.

Curriculum Vitae, June 1, 2015
Frank P. Barajas
Professor, History Program and Chicana/o Studies
California State University Channel Islands
One University Drive
Camarillo, CA 93012
805.437.8862
frank.barajas@csuci.edu
http://www.frankpbarajas.blogspot.com/


EDUCATION:

AA, Moorpark College
Moorpark, California

BA and MA History, California State University, Fresno
Fresno, California

PhD History Claremont Graduate University
Claremont, California

TEACHING

2012- Present Professor

2007-2011 Associate Professor at California State University Channel Islands

2001-2007 Tenure-track Assistant Professor at
California State University Channel Islands

1992-2001 Tenured at Cypress College.

SCHOLARLY AND CREATIVE ACTIVITIES

PUBLICATIONS:

Peer Reviewed

“Community and Measured Militancy: The Ventura County Community Service Organization, 1958-1968.” Southern California Quarterly 96 no. 3 (Fall 2014): 313-349.

Curious Unions: Mexican American Workers and Resistance in Oxnard, California, 1898-1961. University of Nebraska Press, 2012.

David G. Garcia, Tara J. Yosso, and Frank P. Barajas"'A Few of the Brightest, Cleanest Mexican Children': School Segregation as a Form of Mundane Educational Racism in Oxnard, California, 1900-1940." Harvard Educational Review Spring 2012: 1-25.

“An Invading Army: A Civil Gang Injunction in a Southern California Chicana/o Community.” Latino Studies 5 no. 4 (Winter 2007): 393-417.

“The Defense Committees of Sleepy Lagoon: A Convergent Struggle against Fascism, 1942-1944.” Aztlán: A Journal of Chicano Studies 31 no. 1 (Spring 2006): 33-62.

“Resistance, Radicalism, and Repression on the Oxnard Plain: The Social Context of the Betabelero Strike of 1933.” Western Historical Quarterly XXXV no. 1 (Spring 2004): 27-51.

Non-Peer Reviewed

“I got mine. You’re out of luck!” Ventura County Star newspaper. May 16, 2015.
(http://www.vcstar.com/opinion/columnists/frank-p-barajas-i-got-mine-youre-out-of-luck_54013186)
--“Do something about immense student debt in California.” The Bakersfield Californian newspaper. May 17, 2015.
(http://www.bakersfield.com/Opinion/2015/05/04/FRANK-P-BARAJAS-Do-something-about-immense-student-debt-in-California.html)

“Making college affordable for California students.” Ventura County Star newspaper. February 5, 2015.
(http://www.vcstar.com/opinion/columnists/frank-p-barajas-making-college-affordable-for-california-students_22857506)
--“Governor, legislature need to make college more afforcable.” The Bakersfield Californian. January 23, 2015.
(http://www.bakersfield.com/Opinion/2015/01/23/FRANK-BARAJAS-Governor-legislature-need-to-make-college-more-affordable.html)

“Decolonizing the Newspaper: The Historian and the Op-Ed.” Perspectives: The Newsmagazine of the American Historical Association. February 1015.
(http://sites.duke.edu/hpdc/2015/03/02/frank-p-barajas-decolonizing-the-newspaper-the-historian-and-the-op-ed/)

“Are We Giving Cesar Too Much Credit.” History News Service (http://hnn.us/search?q=barajas) April 7, 2014.

“Remember the Latinos in the ‘So Go Created a Farmer’ Super Bowl Ad Last Year? Neither Do We.” History News Network (http://historynewsnetwork.org/article/154604) January 30, 2014.

The National Park Service Explores the History of Farm Labor in America.” History News Service (http://historynewsservice.org/2011/05/the-national-park-service-explores-the-history-of-farm-labor-in-america/) May 3, 2011.
--“Park Service Explores the History of Farm Labor.” Ventura County Star newspaper. May 7, 2011.
--Dallas Morning News link to Ventura County Star
--“Reconstructing the History of Farm Labor in America.” The Bakersfield Californian.” May 7, 2011.
--“The National Park Service Explores the History of Farm Labor in America.” History News Network (http://hnn.us/articles/139080.html) May 8, 2011.

“The Alinsky, Chavez, Obama Connection.” Ventura County Star newspaper. November 2, 2008.
--“The Alinsky, Chavez, Obama Connection.” San Benito News newspaper. November 2, 2008

“New Face of Segregation.” Ventura County Star newspaper. January 20, 2008.

“Democracy, history linked.” Ventura County Star newspaper. September 27, 2007.

“Labor (and Community) Day.” Ventura County Star newspaper. August 31, 2007.

“Entertaining Democracy.” Ventura County Star newspaper. September 3, 2006.

BOOK REVIEWS:

Palomino: Clinton Jencks and Mexican-American Unionism in the American Southwest by James J. Lorence. University of Illinois Press, 20013) for the New Mexico Historical Review, Summer 2014: 409-410.

Justinian Caire and Santa Cruz Islands: The Rise and Fall of a California Dynasty by Frederic Caire Chiles. (Arthur H. Clark Co., 2011) for the Journal of San Diego History, Spring 2012 28 ½: 106-108.

SCHOLARLY PRESENTATIONS

“An Environment of Contention: Rachel Wong’s Struggle to Defend School Integration” Presented at the Pacific Coast Branch of the American Historical Association, August 15, 2015 Portland Oregon.

“A Mexican American with Moxie: Rachel Murguia Wong’s Struggle to Defend School Integration, 1968-1973. Presented at Nuestra América: Rethinking Fronteras in US History A Conference Honoring the Career of Vicki L. Ruiz. February 20, 2015 University of California at Irvine.

TEACHING

2007-2015 Professor at California State University Channel Islands
Courses:

HIST 270 The United States to 1877
HIST 271 The United States Since 1877
HIST 280 The Historian’s Craft
ENG/HIST 334 Narratives of Southern California
HIST 350 Chicano History and Culture
HIST 369 California History and Culture
CHS/HIST 402 So. Cal. Chicana/o Hist. and Culture
ENGL/HIST 430 Tradition and Transformation
HIST 492 Internship/Service Learning
HIST 494 Independent Research
CHS 497 Directed Study
HIST 499 Capstone in History
HIST 1030-I OLLI Get to Know Your Neighbor
HIST 1041-1 OLLI 20th Century Southern California
HIST 1046-1 Mexican American History

1992-2001 Tenured at Cypress College.

Wednesday, September 26, 2007

Ken Burns: Defend the Honor AND Take Back Your History Press Conference and Tribute




On Sunday, September 23, approximately 150 people attended the Defend The Honor Campaign AND Take Back Your History demonstration/press conference in front of the KCET Studios in Los Angeles protesting Ken Burns’ The War documentary on World War II. Chicano/Latino veterans, students, professors, and activists expressed criticism of Burns omitting the stories of sacrifice and valor of Chicano/Latino veterans from his initial production of the documentary and then splicing an addendum of footage of Chicano/Latino veterans into the project only after intense pressure from communities throughout the United States.

Within the demonstration were counter-demonstrators defending PBS (the Public Broadcasting Service) contending that Ken Burns is not a racist, arguing for “one nation” and “one language,” “stop bullying PBS,” and, particularly a white pick-up truck patrolling the protest area with US Marine messages on its bed while blaring nationalist songs from an outboard speaker system. The counter-demonstrators seem to have confused the demand for the integration of the WWII experience of Chicano/Latino veterans into the documentary as unpatriotic.

The Larry Amaya Greater Los Angeles chapter of the American G.I. Forum informed participants of the contributions of Chicano/Latino veterans. One story recounted US Army General Douglas MacArthur’s demand, “Send me more Mexicans,” upon returning to the Philippines. Apparently, the courageous fighting of Chicanos made an impression on the general. Community activist, educator, and historical figure of the 1968 East Los Angeles student walkouts, Sal Castro detailed to reporters Burns’ pattern of excluding the experiences of Chicano/Latinos in his documentaries—most blatantly those having to do with baseball and the latest on WWII.

Signs protesting Burns’ The War documentary expressed: “WE ARE NOT AN ‘AFTER THOUGHT’!”; “PBS LIES!”; “KEN BURNS IS RACIST”; “REMEMBER THE BORINQUENEER PUERTO RICO”; “ABAJO CON BURNS”; “DON’T ERASE OUR HISTORY”; “TELL US KIDS THE TRUTH; and “WE ARE AMERICANS TOO!!!”

Demonstrations to Ken Burns’ historical erasure of 500,000 Chicana/o/Latino WWII veterans were held across the United States in Austin, San Antonio, San Diego, San Francisco, Los Angeles and other cities. Central to the organizing of these events were Sal Castro, Jorge Garcia, David Sandoval, Maggie Rivas-Rodriguez, and Rudy Acuña.
fpb

Saturday, September 22, 2007

Acuña Art Gallery Reception "One Love: Arte Visions from the Four Corners of the World" Exhibit

Last night I attended the One Love: Arte Visions from the Four Corners of the World reception for the international exhibit of: Paul Dilworth (England), Christine Leong (Hong Kong), Elan Cohen (Bali), the Cusco School (Cusco, Peru), and the Orchids of the World (Zuma Canyon Orchids, Malibu). Proprietors Dr. Deborah De Vries and Armando Vazquez of the Acuña Art Gallery @ Café on A continue to culturally nourish the Southern California region with art that captivates the soul while challenging the intellect of all who encounter the paintings, sculptures, and arrangements in the building.

In addition to providing a magnet venue of artistic expression, Dr. De Vries and Mr. Vazquez co-direct the Keys Leadership Academy for at-risk youth. I often state to people that the Café on A is the cultural conscious of Ventura County, particularly when issues adversely affect the Chicana/o community.

If the work that the two perform from the Café were not enough, Dr. De Vries is a professor at Oxnard College and a school board member of the Oxnard School District; Mr. Vazquez is an artist who is at the moment is writing a novel based on his 35 years of work with at-risk young Chicanas.

Wednesday, September 12, 2007

civil gang injunction essay

I received notice today that the peer-reviewed journal Latino Studies accepted for publication my essay on the institution of a civil gang injunction in the City of Oxnard in 2004. The piece is titled, “An Invading Army: A Civil Gang Injunction in a Southern California Chicana/o Community” and is scheduled to appear in the December 2007, volume 5, issue 4 edition of the journal.

Latino Studies has been named Runner up in the Council of Editors of Learned Journals (CELJ) Awards for Scholarly Achievement - Best New Journal category...”

Friday, August 31, 2007

Labor (and Community) Day

As Labor Day is celebrated, we should take pause to recognize the rich history of community building via labor struggle. Ventura County provides inspiring examples of people coming closer together as they demanded fair wages and improved working conditions. On the Oxnard Plain, for example, two bitter strikes took place involving sugar beet farm laborers (betabeleros, as they would be called) during the early decades of the twentieth century. In resisting a 50% wage cut in the thinning of sugar beets, Japanese and Mexican betabeleros united in forming the Japanese Mexican Labor Association in February of 1903. After a month-long struggle and a dramatic downtown shot-out resulting in five wounded and one fatality, growers agreed to revert to the pre-strike wage rate. The JMLA strike of 1903 is particularly significant in the history of the United States as it serves as a brilliant and unique example of intercultural labor solidarity.

During the Great Depression’s nadir, in August of 1933 Oxnard betabeleros and the Cannery Agricultural Worker Industrial Union again resisted the curtailing of the wage scale, this time by 12%. Although ultimately unsuccessful, the 1933 betabelero strike demonstrated the strength and openness of the Mexican community in drawing upon similar intercultural support from the Filipino Protective League, Ella Winter (wife of the renowned muckraking journalist Lincoln Steffens) and the National Committee for the Defense of Political Prisoners, and Al Wirrin of the American Civil Liberties Union.

Prior to the nation’s entrance into WWII, a county-wide citrus strike arose. Similar to the demands of the previous two disputes, workers in lemon and orange orchards and packinghouses demanded union recognition, improved working conditions, and a 12% raise in wages. Simultaneously, families of the citrus industry in Rancho Sespe, Somis, and other communities banded together in creating life sustaining cultural events and fundraisers. Those who found themselves displaced from citrus company housing also assembled surrogate government councils within a federal Farm Security Administration camp in Oxnard of the likes detailed in John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath. As in 1933, this strike to increase the wages of workers ended in failure. The effort for economic justice, however, presaged the Post-WWII demands for equal treatment under the law. This strike, in particular, continues to live in the cultural memory of Ventura County residents as an inspiring saga of labor and community solidarity.

Recognizing the tradition of community and labor activism in Ventura County, during the fall of 1958 the Community Service Organization sent a person named Cesar Chavez to create a chapter to establish citizenship courses, voter registration drives, and non-partisan get out the vote campaigns within the La Colonia barrio of Oxnard. Moreover, CSO members throughout the county came to challenge the exploitive use of bracero agricultural laborers (federally subsidized Mexican guest workers). Cesar Chavez’s experiences as a CSO organizer, being once himself a betabelero in Ventura County, and an intermittent resident introduced him to the degrading situations that workers in fields encountered; this included but was not limited to the absence of restrooms, drinking water, the backbreaking use of the infamous el cortito (the short-handle hoe), and wages insufficient to support a family. Indeed, the CSO’s successful leveraging of Ventura County’s community assets for the betterment of labor answered a question that he held: Could an effective farm workers union be created to address these issues? The answer was Si Se Puede (yes it can be done)!

So as many of us may have the privilege of enjoying this three day holiday weekend, we must commemorate the importance of community in protecting and advancing the interests of labor everywhere.
fpb

Saturday, August 25, 2007

Peter Richardson Presentation

On September 27th at 10:30-11:45 at California State University Channel Islands, Carey McWilliams biographer Peter Richardson will present a lecture titled, “American Prophet: The Civic Engagement and Public Scholarship of Carey McWilliams.” The event will be held in Malibu Hall 100 and is open to the public. For free parking take the Vista Bus to the university from the Metrolink Station in Camarillo. All day campus parking permits cost $6.